Wednesday, February 25, 2015

A Healthy Approach to Physical Fitness Training

Mark Sisson, over at MarksDailyApple.com posted a good article called Is Your Workout Worth The Risk? Check it out if you work out regularly as it has really good points about listening to your body, limiting/eliminating higher-risk exercises, good form, and many other common-sense daily practices. While his post and this one are primarily for the person who works out regularly, the advice can help anyone. As Mark says, everyone will deal with this issue sooner or later.
A recent survey of CrossFit athletes found that 73.5% had experienced an injury during training, 7% of which required surgery. But before the anti-CrossFit crowd starts gloating, realize that this injury rate is similar to Olympic lifting, powerlifting, and gymnastics and lower than contact sports like rugby. Similar polls in runners find that in a given year, 13% of runners experience knee injuries, 8% get Achilles tendinitis, 7% suffer hamstring pulls, 10% deal with plantar fasciitis, 10% have shin splints, 14% report iliotibial band syndrome, and 6% get stress fractures. There’s no way around it: engaging in non-essential, extracurricular bouts of physical exertion, also known as working out, carries some risk. Not working out carries its own set of (greater) risks, but that’s beside the point. As many a lauded strength coach has said, injuries are a matter of when, not if. And many of these injuries become chronic injuries that stay with you for the rest of your life.
 Though his article is good on the do's and don'ts of training, I would add a few things to Mark's excellent post:

1. Rehabilitation of injured joints and muscles is critical.
My goal is to rehab the injury so that area is stronger than it was before. Finding a good PT (physical therapist) and maintaining a good relationship with them is critical as well. It can be a PT or DC or sports massage or Osteopath - whatever works for you. 

2. Backs seem to an issue for most people sooner or later. Personally, I know more people with messed up backs from doing yoga so be careful if yoga is your thing.  Foundation Training developed by Dr Eric Goodman has proven itself with my wife, son and myself.

3. An excellent joint mobility program is call R-phase by Eric Cobb. 

4. Egoscue Training was recommended by my Tai Chi teacher. I have done some of the online videos to help me through a knee tweak from skiing and the exercises are simple and seem to work.

The bottom line is that a workout regimen needs to have a preventative group of movements
like Pilates, Foundation Training, R-Phase, etc. Though I have done Tai Chi for 20+ years, I hesitate to recommend it or Yoga because there is definitely a risk of injury if done incorrectly and in my experience there are not a lot of good teachers who know how to limit students egos to push and then get hurt. For example, Upward Dog done with the legs off the ground is very high risk for lower back injury. Most people should be doing Cobra with no weight on the lower back muscles. Upward Dog done by someone who knows the technique and has a good teacher who can spot slight form issues is safe, but, is it worth the risk?

In summary, think about breaking your training into two parts. For every workout day (a run, crossfit, kettlebells, weight training, etc), have a core/preventative day like Pilates, Foundation Training, joint mobility, balance, etc.  And, get on good terms with a PT and rehab all your injuries back to making the injured component better than it was before. Invest time in finding a PT, ART specialist, ROLF'ing, Osteopath, etc that you trust and has a record of success helping you.

And, last by not least, have a goal for how long you want to live and treat your body as if it has to last that long. If your goal is 100 and you want to be active that long, look at good examples like Jack LaLanne or others of what they did to be active and healthy to the end.

In an effort to keep this post short and readable, I included links and brief mentions of many resources but did not go into detail. Use the comments section to ask questions about any areas that you want more information. Have a happy body day and be kind to it! 

2 comments:

Paul Sojka said...

I have completely given up working out for this very reason. I have tried the gym, Yoga, Karate, and other forms of what I would call trying to work out aggressively. It all ends in some type of injury and then I have to be somewhat inactive until I heal. This is extremely frustrating. Now let me clarify a few things. I am not advocating inactivity and a lethargic lifestyle. On the contrary. Intense workouts are for the young or middle aged at best. I am almost 60 so I don't think I will live until I am 120. Exercise is very important. But at my age I will eat right, take long walks, hike, canoe, kayak,bike, i.e. low impact exercise. This does not damage me at this stage of my life and still gives me the rewards of an active life.

Paul Sojka

Sojka's Call said...

Paul - I would recommend doing only the preventative type exercises like Foundation Training, Pilates, R-Phase, etc. which are all more rehabilitative types of movement to keep you supple and work the smaller stabilizer muscles. But, hey, walking, canoeing, kayaking, biking like you are doing are excellent and if you do something 5-7 days a week, then you will be fine and enjoy your life. Heck, I would say getting those rewards of an active life that put a smile on your face are more important than anything because a positive outlook and daily satisfaction of a life well-lived are what motivate us to keep living life to the fullest.